The Ambassador of Latvia to NATO: our biggest threats are the inflow of Ukrainian refugees and the outflow of our population

From Fort Russ

August 4, 2015
Translated by Kristina Rus
The Ambassador of Latvia to NATO, Indulis Berzins announced the list of the biggest threats to the country on the program “900 seconds” on the channel LNT.

Indulis Berzins, who previously held various government posts, entered the position of Ambassador to NATO last week. He shared his perspective about the security of the state on a TV program. The greatest threat is a huge influx of refugees from Ukraine. As the diplomat noted, he was warned about such a scenario by the experts involved in the Ukrainian crisis.

Additionally, Indulis Berzins said that a threat to Latvia is the pessimistic mood of its inhabitants, many of whom resent their country and move abroad. 

“If the citizens of Latvia will not agree that we need this state, it will create the greatest threat to the security of the country,” – the Ambassador said. 


He also noted that “a group of professional commentators appeared online, which rejects the transatlantic orientation of Latvia”.

Indulis Berzins added that “the most important thing now is to ensure the security of the entire region.” In his words, “the increased presence of allies in the Baltic States, including Latvia, would enhance security and would give a clear signal to any country, that would want to somehow interfere in our internal affairs”.

Speaking about the possible deployment of NATO bases in the Baltic States, the Ambassador said that “now we are working hard to implement the decisions of the Wales summit, not requiring a permanent presence of military forces of other countries of the Alliance in Latvia”.

At the same time, he said, “various military exercises and maneuvers conducted in Latvia, are the guarantor of the policy of containment”.

Indulis Berzins added: “This format does not involve the need for permanent bases. It involves provision of weapons, ammunition and arms, which is very significant — if the situation gets worse, the soldiers, coming over here, will not have to bring equipment.”

However, he stressed that “a permanent base of the Alliance was established in Latvia or the presence of allies was increased, it would only help its security”. At the same time a new envoy to NATO has recognized that there is no direct military threat to Latvia today.

 

http://fortruss.blogspot.com/2015/08/the-ambassador-of-latvia-to-nato-our.html

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Revealed: how Ukrainian tanks are shelling the center of Donetsk — video, Eng. subtitles

Posted on Fort Russ

August 3rd, 2015
Vox Populi Evo

DPR forensic analysis reveal how Ukrainian Tanks are able to shell the center of Donetsk from a distance of up to 20km.

Comment below video:

“Ukrainian” … Ukrainian you mean Americans or Knowledge from Americans !

We all know Americans cannot function unless they are Killing / Murdering people of Other Countries … Over 200 Million Innocent Unarmed Civilians Since 1945 have been Murdered by Americans so that the American Flag can fly in another Country !

http://fortruss.blogspot.com/2015/08/revealed-how-ukrainian-tanks-are.html

Fort Russ’s dirty-bomb false-flag warning was right

Fort Russ

August 6th, 2015

Fort Russ Staff
photo credit: Security Service of Ukraine
Yesterday J. Flores of our editorial management issued a public warning regarding a possible imminent dirty bomb threat.
It turns out that these suspicions were well founded.
The suspicion, according to Flores,  was based on two stories – Poroshenko’s urgent calling of the war council, and a sudden western media propaganda news-cycle fixation that Novorossiya militias may use a ‘dirty bomb’ in the Ukraine conflict, which began over last weekend.
Security Service of Ukraine
Today RT reported that the Ukrainian SBU has apprehended a ring of Uranium smugglers who had a ‘Pringles’ chips canister containing uranium-238 which they had intended to sell.
The RT story ‘strangely’ combines this report with a story about the Right Sektor clashes with the Kiev Junta.
This is interesting for us also, without stating it outright, we are  more free to draw the connection:
We are not unreasonable in speculating that the Right Sektor may have wanted to use a dirty bomb in the front on UAF forces, and blame the Novorossiyan side for it.  Western media was clearly establishing the narrative that Novorossiya would be responsible for it. This would have established several simultaneous goals for both the US and the Pravy Sektor.
The United States has taken an “adaptive approach”, a common feature in 4th Generation Warfare and Hybrid Warfare, which allows them to shift support between the Kiev Junta and the Pravy Sektor related groups.

http://fortruss.blogspot.com/2015/08/fort-russs-dirty-bomb-false-flag.html

A “dirty bomb” false flag imminent?

From Fort Russ

August 4th, 2015

Fort Russ – Joaquin Flores – (a special thanks to Kevin Deikoff for sending us The Times piece
The Times.co,uk used this photo in their ‘Rebels to make dirty bomb’ piece, though this photo is from 10-20-14 when the nearly the opposite actually occurred: Kiev Junta forces bombed a chemical facility in Donetsk
Let’s look at two significant news pieces, the first that Poroshenko called an emergency session of the war council today, and three days ago that western press starting to create buzz about Novorossiyan ‘rebels’ creating a ‘dirty bomb’.  It is difficult not to want to put these together and concede the possibility that something is in the works.
There are good reasons for this, there is not only a precedent for these in this conflict, but they arose at similar times.  The last few times that the US tried this, with the downing of MH-17 and then the ‘shelling of Mariupol’ false flag, the US felt unable gain the upper hand either through regular proxy combat or its policy of terrorism upon civilians.
While nothing is guaranteed to happen, this definitely means we should be on the look out for such an event in the very near future.

Oleg Tsarev of the DPR also expressed similar concerns, in a piece which we translated for Fort Russ – that can be read here: http://fortruss.blogspot.com/2015/08/why-did-times-publish-article-about.html

Our role as public servants, citizen media, is to inoculate mass publics against any attempt to pin a future ‘chemical attack’ on the Novorossiyan armies.  Even if nothing comes of it this time, it doesn’t rule out that they had something in the works.  Many analysts have indicated that publicizing and ‘calling out’ such false flag attempts in their early stages can actually hedge the US Empire’s bets that they can pull it off.
Of course, the endemically Russophobic and pro-imperialist Times.co.uk  scribbles their piece for good reason; they have a job to do, which is creating near-term expectation that the ‘Ruskies’ are back to their old evil tricks, and are planning something soon.
But as we’ve seen before, the photo used to generate clicks and reads, and to give the veil of ‘truth’ as in sort of suggesting ‘photographic evidence’, is not what they are writing about.  Just as in the conflicts in Syria and elsewhere, it depicts the effects of something the US backed side has done.
We reverse searched this image through Google, and found that it does not depict anything the ‘Russians did’, but in fact is a photo from October 20th, 2014, of a chemical plant in Donetsk that was shelled by the UAF.  Fancy that.

Also, Kevin Deikoff notes: “Max Tucker, writer of this piece, is a western intelligence asset. He speaks Russian and studied history for 3 years at the University of Bristol(?). “Articles” by him started appearing in 2013 as he was supposedly working for 3.5yrs exposing human rights abuses in Ukraine and the South Caucasus as Amnesty International’s expert in the region. Suddenly, he appears as news editor for the Kiev Post in December 2014. Now he puts together ‘pieces’ for the Times, News Week, and others. http://ukrcanco.org/maxim-tucker-putin-doesn-t-respond…/ “

“‘Max Tucker’ has recently added ‘media strategist’ to his journalist description.’Max Tucker’ doesn’t seem to have much of a history. Maxim Shkolnik, of Tucker, Georgia, was arrested for trafficking cocaine 01-09-2007 – not that these people are one and the same.”

http://fortruss.blogspot.com/2015/08/a-dirty-bomb-false-flag-imminent.html

U.S. instructors are in Ukraine to learn how to fight Russia

From Fort Russ

(Photo: Manu Brabo/AFP via Getty)
 
Kristina Rus: 
 
What advantage can the 10 times bigger defense budget buy for the US army over Russia? 
 
“We have great signals intelligence, and we can listen all day long, but we can’t shut them down one-tenth to the degree they can us

Joaquin Flores:  

We saw this article and thought our readers would find it interesting.  While reinforcing the western narrative of intimate Russian involvement, it also talks about a technology gap that the US seems to be suffering in the area of jamming. This may or may not be true: during the Cold War the US often would inflate Russian military prowess in order to justify its own increased expenditures.  These resulted in windfall profits for the military industrial complex.  At the same time, the claim in itself seems possibly true.  The US has not had to focus on developing these technologies, as it had specifically targeted countries that were technologically deficient.  Now that the US is against a more formidable opponent, whether directly or through proxies, it seems to make sense that its own short-comings would be pronounced more now than at any point in the recent past.


Electronic Warfare: What US Army Can Learn From Ukraine
 
 
 

WASHINGTON — The US military has for weeks been training Ukrainian forces in US tactics, but the commander of US Army Europe says Ukrainian forces, who are fighting Russian-backed separatists, have much to teach their US trainers.

Ukrainian forces have grappled with formidable Russian electronic warfare capabilities that analysts say would prove withering even to the US ground forces. The US Army has also jammed insurgent communications from the air and ground on a limited basis, and it is developing a powerful arsenal of jamming systems, but these are not expected until 2023.

“Our soldiers are doing the training with the Ukrainians and we’ve learned a lot from the Ukrainians,” said Lt. Gen. Ben Hodges. “A third of the [Ukrainian] soldiers have served in the … combat zone, and no Americans have been under Russian artillery or rocket fire, or significant Russian electronic warfare, jamming or collecting — and these Ukrainians have. It’s interesting to hear what they have learned.”

Hodges acknowledged that US troops are learning from Ukrainians about Russia’s jamming capability, its ranges, types and the ways it has been employed. He has previously described the quality and sophistication of Russian electronic warfare as “eye-watering.”

Russia maintains an ability to destroy command-and-control networks by jamming radio communications, radars and GPS signals, according to Laurie Buckhout, former chief of the US Army’s electronic warfare division, now CEO of the Corvus Group. In contrast with the US, Russia has large units dedicated to electronic warfare, known as EW, which it dedicates to ground electronic attack, jamming communications, radar and command-and-control nets.

Though Ukrainian troops lack the materiel to protect themselves from this form of attack, the Ukrainian military’s institutional knowledge as a former Soviet republic will help it understand how Russia fights, and its troops will have trained to operate while being jammed, Buckhout said. That’s something US ground forces can learn.

“Our biggest problem is we have not fought in a comms-degraded environment for decades, so we don’t know how to do it,” Buckhout said. “We lack not only tactics, techniques and procedures but the training to fight in a comms-degraded environment.”

It’s not hard to see why EW is an attractive option for Russia while the eyes of the world are on it. Not only is it highly effective, but as a non-kinetic form of attack, it is harder to trace and less likely to be viewed as overt aggression, and as such, less likely to incite the ire of the international community, Buckhout said.

In a fight, Russia’s forces can hinder a target’s ability to respond to, say, an artillery attack, allowing them to fire on an enemy with impunity. Ukrainian forces would be unable to coordinate a defense against incoming rockets and missiles, or release counter battery fire.

“If your radars don’t see incoming fire, you can’t coordinate counterfire,” Buckhout said.

The US, Buckhout said, lacks a significant electronic attack capability.

“We have great signals intelligence, and we can listen all day long, but we can’t shut them down one-tenth to the degree they can us,” she said. “We are very unprotected from their attacks on our network.”

Multifunctional EW

Col. Jeffrey Church, the Army’s electronic warfare division chief, acknowledged that since the Cold War, adversaries have continued to modernize their EW capabilities, while the Army began reinvesting its capabilities for Iraq and Afghanistan. Church called the fielding of Army electronic warfare equipment the “No. 1 priority” of his job.

“The  Army must have electronic warfare capabilities that could be used to dominate key terrain on the electromagnetic spectrum against any adversary,” Church said.

A developing Army program, Multifunctional Electronic Warfare (MFEW), is intended to provide an offensive electronic attack capability, able to jam cell phone, satellite and GPS signals, said Lt. Col. Gregory Griffin, chief of the Electronic Warfare Division’s programs and requirements branch. However, the focus had been until recent years on “defensive electronic attack,” namely counter-radio-controlled-IED devices that create bubbles of protective jamming around vehicles and people, and signals collection for intelligence purposes.

The Army has demonstrated some ability to counter enemy communications, not under formal acquisitions programs but as quick-reaction capabilities. In Afghanistan, the Army used a handful of C-12 aircraft equipped with Communications, Electronic Attack, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (CEASAR) jamming pods to jam insurgent push-to-talk radios, and two fixed-site systems — Ground Auto Targeting Observation/Reactive (GATOR) jammer and Duke V2 EA — to jam radios and repeater towers.

On an ad hoc basis, troops in Afghanistan used GATOR — conceived to protect forward operating bases — to suppress repeater towers while on patrol or training Afghan forces, providing themselves the freedom to maneuver while denying communications to potential enemies, Griffin said.

“It was unlimited capability, limited by the number of systems,” Griffin said. “Honestly, we just did not have enough to support the demand that was in the Army.”

The Army’s electronic warfare cadre, which totals 813 officers, warrant officers and noncommissioned officers,  has wielded more theory than hardware, except when deployed. In garrison, it was common for these troops to be assigned other jobs, leading to the joke that EW stands for “extra worker” — though this is changing as the Army ramps up its electronic warfare materiel strategy, Griffin said.

MFEW, due to reach initial operating capability in 2023 and full operating capability in 2027, is intended to offer a suite of powerful, sophisticated sensors and jammers for in the air, on ground vehicles and in fixed locations. The Army is due to consider a capability design document for the “air large” capability, akin to Caesar, potentially for a C-12 or a MQ-8 Fire Scout drone. Last year it tested the Networked Electronic Warfare Remotely Operated (NERO), a jamming pod attached to the Gray Eagle drone.

The Defense Department in March set up a panel to address its electronic warfare shortfalls, which, Griffin said, has generated discussion about accelerating the timeline for MFEW.

‘Future of War Is in the Ukraine’

Forces with US Army Europe have for the last 10 weeks been training three battalions of Ukraine Ministry of the Interior troops, known as Ukraine’s national guard. The second cycle of that training was paused so that troops could participate in a combined multinational exercise, underway through early August, and it will resume and conclude with the third battalion in August.

The Ukrainian military — which is in the midst of a reform and modernization effort even as it wars with Russia — has shown interest in creating a noncommissioned officer corps modeled after that of the US, Hodges said. Ukrainian military officials charged with reform efforts visited Washington in recent weeks and, in a press conference, acknowledged the challenges of corruption and shoddy soldier equipment, which they sought to correct.

But Konstiantyn Liesnik, an adviser to the Defense Ministry’s reform office and head of its working group for logistics and procurement, noted the US military’s experience in recent years has concerned insurgents in Iraq and Afghanistan, not a powerful, organized and well-equipped adversary like Russia.

The future of war is in the Ukraine, and I think in this case our experience is very important to US personnel how war should be in this century and next century,” Liesnik said.

Beyond electronic warfare, Russian anti-aircraft rockets have prevented Ukrainian forces from using their airplanes, and it has had to consider personal armor that can protect against artillery.

Ukrainian forces interacting with US soldiers have spoken frankly about their difficulties, something Hodges said he saw firsthand when the chief of the Ukrainian Army, at an event attended by senior leaders from other countries, discussed with a group of officers  his force’s battlefield experiences and shortcomings.

“I have been very impressed with the earnestness of the Ukrainian military to fix their shortcomings and improve their capabilities,” Hodges said. “It was one of the most professional things I have ever seen of any army, and they were very candid: We were not prepared to do this, and here’s how we adapted.”

Ukrainian troops have not only had to adapt to Russian electronic warfare, but its artillery and unmanned aerial systems. The Ukrainian Army official, Hodges said, also detailed how unprepared Ukrainian troops have been for the number of casualties and their treatment.

The US provided Ukraine with lightweight counter-mortar radars in November 2014, which Hodges said its troops have “used in ways we have not used it ourselves, and made it more effective than we thought was possible.” These troops, he said, would be savvy enough to operate a more advanced radar with a wider range — which the Pentagon is reportedly in talks to send.

An official at the US State Department said the administration believes there is no military resolution to this crisis, but Ukraine has the right to defend itself. To that end, it announced a $75 million Defense Department aid package in March that includes 30 armored Humvees, 200 other Humvees, radios and unarmed surveillance drones, night-vision devices and medical supplies.

The 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team, based in Vicenza, Italy, had been training Ukrainian troops in western Ukraine, in battlefield medicine, casualty evacuation, and tactical tasks such as anti-roadside bomb techniques and basic battlefield movement.

Saber Guardian, a command post exercise which rotates between Ukraine, Romania and Bulgaria, this year was linked to Rapid Trident, an annual field training exercise held in Ukraine, according to the US Army. The combined exercise, which includes roughly 1,800 soldiers from 18 different nations, is meant to focus on defensive operations to ensure a safe and secure environment within the operating environment.

This year’s scenario consists of a host nation that comes under attack. The nation is able to defend itself at great cost. A multinational force is sent to assist the host nation and the challenge is to bring together and train a multinational brigade, which would then be sent to assist the host nation in its defense.

 

http://fortruss.blogspot.com/2015/08/us-instructors-are-in-ukraine-to-learn.html

Доклад посла СССР в Японии о состоянии Хиросимы и Нагасаки после атомных бомбардировок

hirosima

К 70-летию атомных бомбардировок Хиросимы и Нагасаки Российское историческое общество впервые публикует предоставленный Архивом внешней политики России доклад посла СССР в Японии о состоянии этих городов спустя месяц после атаки.

Доклад посла СССР в Японии и Пояснительная записка к докладу. Архив внешней политики РФ, ф.06, оп.8, п.7, д.96

http://rushistory.org/putevoditel/archives/doklad-posla-sssr-v-yaponii-o-sostoyanii-khirosimy-i-nagasaki-posle-atomnykh-bombardirovok.html

Russia declassifies report on the aftermath of the US nuclear bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; U.S. said Japanese exaggerated effects of nuclear bomb.[audio]

From Fort Russ

August 5, 2015
Kristina Rus
 
Russian Historical Society has published a report of the Soviet ambassador to Japan on the aftermath of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki from the Archive of Foreign Policy of Russia in time for the 70-th anniversary of the attacks. The report was recorded a month after the attacks.

The following is an audio reading of highlights of the report, read by journalist Maurice Herman:

https://youtu.be/I-X87v25rhI

The following are the highlights of the report:

The train terminal and the city of Hiroshima were destroyed so much that there was no shelter to hide from the rain.
The city was a scorched plain with 15-20 cement buildings left standing.
Several dozen thousand people huddled in the dugouts on the outskirts of the city.
People who came to help the victims during the first 5-10 days died.
A month after the bombing grass began to grow and new leaves appeared on the burned trees.
Glass windows in the cement building of police department, which was left standing, blew out inward. The ceiling was bulging upwards.
The zone of impact was 6-8 kilometers, where all the buildings were damaged.
At 5-6 kilometers mostly roofs were damaged.
Some areas were not affected by the rays, suggesting that the energy was expelled unequally by bursts. Some people who where close to the injured did not receive any burns. This pertains to sections significantly removed from the impact.

Everything alive was destroyed in the radius of one kilometer.

The sound and the flash were heard and seen 50 kilometers away.

On person reported seeing a flash and feeling a touch of a warm stream on his cheek and a needle pinch.

Many people only had injuries from shattered glass.

Burns were mainly on the face, arms and legs.

A doctor reported seeing three bombs dropped on parachutes, two of which did not explode and were collected by the military. The doctor experienced diarrhea after drinking the water. Other rescuers got sick after 36 hours. The doctor said that in those affected the white blood cell count reduced from 8000 per cubic centimeter to 3,000, 1,000 and even 300, which causes bleeding from nose, throat, eyes, and from the uterus in females. The injured die after 3-4 days.

The injured, who are evacuated heal faster. Those who drank or rinsed with water in the impact area died thereafter.

After a month it was considered safe to stay in the impact zone, however it was still not conclusive.

According to the doctor, rubber clothing offered protection against uranium, as well as any material which is a conductor of electricity.

A girl who visited the area a few days after the blast got sick in 1-2 weeks and died 3 days after.

Nagasaki is divided into two sections by a mountain. The section sheltered from the blast by a mountain had much less destruction.

Japanese driver in Nagasaki said no rescue work was done on the day of the bombing, because the city was engulfed in fire.

Nagasaki bomb was dropped over a university hospital in Urakami district (near a Mitsubishi plant), all the patients and the staff of the hospital died.

The driver said, some children who were up on the trees [playing?] survived, but those on the ground died.

Most people in Hiroshima said the bomb was dropped on a parachute and detonated 500-600 feet above the ground.

The head of the sanitary service of the 5th American fleet, commander Willkatts said that no parachutes were used in the dropping of the bombs. He also said no bomb could fall without detonating. 

He said after the bombing the zone of impact is safe and the Japanese are exaggerating the effects of a nuclear bomb.

(The pictures above are from the online sources, and not from the report)